Sunday, May 18, 2014

A new book

Best Mates 
By Philippa Werry and Bob Kerr 
Published by New Holland Publishers
I visited Gallipoli some years ago. I couldn’t afford to take the commercial tours so I would catch the local bus to Kabatepe and then walk for an hour down the beach to Anzac Cove. I would walk back at the end of the day expecting to meet the bus but I never did catch the bus because I would be invited to dinner by one of the Turkish families that would be picnicking under the pine trees along the coast. 

They would ask me where I was from and I would say New Zealand and that I had been looking at the place where the New Zealanders landed in 1915. I would ask my hosts why they were so kindly disposed to New Zealanders since we had tried to invade their country. They invariably suggested that we had picked a rather bad place to land because the young commander on the top of the hill was Kemal Ataturk and that we helped create his reputation and therefore helped create modern Turkey and my hosts would add but that was a long time ago and would I like another slice of baklava.

It is the same generosity that Ataturk voiced when he said the much quoted words that are on the Ataturk memorial on the south coast at Karehana Bay here in Wellington.
“Your sons are now our sons, having lost their lives in this land.” It seems amazingly generous since twice as many Turkish soldiers died defending their home than the invaders did.

When the text for this book arrived in my inbox one Friday I sent a reply straight back to the publishers New Holland saying I was too busy and would not be able to do it. Over the weekend I showed it to my daughter Kathleen. She read it, took her glasses of, wiped her eye and told me to do it. I’m glad she did. It has been great working with the team at New Holland Publishers and it’s been great working with Philippa. You can visit Philippa's website and see all the other excellent books she has written at http://www.philippawerry.co.nz

Here are some pages from the book.
  

As a result of working with New Holland on Best Mates I'm now working on another book with them called The New Zealand Times. A graphic novel that looks at our history through the pages of a small town Newspaper. Here is a double page spread from that work in progress.

Number One Field Punishment at the Tauranga Art Gallery

The characters in Best Mates dashed off to the first World War without giving much thought to what they would encounter. Mark Briggs and Archibald Baxter gave it a lot of thought and refused to go. They were sent to prison and then, along with fourteen other conscientious objectors were taken to the frontline in France where Baxter, Briggs and Lawrence Kirwan were administered Number One Field Punishment in an attempt by the New Zealand Government to persuade them to put on the kings uniform.
This exhibition at the Tauranga Art Gallery includes some paintings from earlier shows on this topic and a major new work A long Row of Stout High Poles. Musician Andrew Laking has composed a sound scape that plays in the gallery with the paintings. To find out more about Andy and his music visit his website a thttp://andylaking.com

Here are some images from the show. Viewers are invited to walk along the wooden duckwalk to view the large painting. The text running along the top of the seven panels is a quote from Baxter's book We Will Not Cease. It reads: "Walking along the duckwalk from the gate I observed a long row of stout high poles. These poles were for the infliction of number one field punishment."





Lippy Pictures film Number One Field Punishment recently aired on TV One. You can watch this brilliant dramatization here. http://tvnz.co.nz/field_punishment_no1/video 

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Gold Strike


An exhibition about the Waihi gold strike of 1912.

This exhibition will be opening at Waihi Arts Centre and Museum on Sunday November the 11th and running until to the 25th of November. It will then show at The Rotorua Museum from 13 April – 30 June 2013, and then at Whitespace Gallery, 12 Crummer Rd. Ponsonby, Auckland during July 2013.
Gold Strike is an imaginative reconstruction of the 1912 Strike - The people, places and the locations of this vivid, violent and ultimately tragic event. The exhibition will be opened exactly 100 years to the day that the striker Fred Evans was killed as he fled from the miners Union Hall on the 11th of November 1912.

The Pukewa workings
122 x 60
The first prospectors to explore the Waihi workings, McCombie and Lee, bored into Pukewa’s harsh, glinting interior.
The open cut
180 x 60
There in Waihi, with its toil and its treasure,
Men’s lives are squandered while earning a crust.
The Talisman Battery

122 x 90
Several deafening batteries of stampers began crushing the quartz rock down to powder.
The Orua flax swamp
63 x 25
Tim Armstrong left school at the age of 11 and worked in the flax-milling industry in the great Orua flax swamp between Bulls and Shannon.
The fun of the world

63 x 25
At 19 Tim Armstrong was working on the railway in Raetihi when he heard of work available the Waihi goldfields. " I thought it would be the place for me, so along with a few mates we made up our minds to roll up our swags and walk to the gold fields… it was the fun of the world at times.”
The Golden Cross mine

63 x 25
At Waihi, Tim Armstrong found work at the Golden Cross mine.  “There they had a union and it was the very thing I wanted.” In no time at all Tim was president of the large Waihi Miners Union.
Bill Parry
180 x 45
The Waihi Miners Union managed to retain a president by paying his salary themselves, and Bill Parry proved his worth during fierce negotiations with the mining company over competitive contracting.
The Rebel
40 x 60
Charles Smith was a “Niagara of Energy”. He was a miner, the president of the local branch of the Socialist Party, the author of frequent articles on Waihi, under the pen-name ‘The Rebel”, and the organiser of Pat Hickey’s 1911 campaign for the parliamentary seat of Ohinemuri.
Pat Hickey
Private collection

By 1911 this ‘roaring boy’ from the Federation of Labour was one of the country’s most powerful political orators. The Waihi socialists selected him as their candidate for the 1911 general election.
Bob Semple
Private Collection

Known as ‘Bob the Ranter, a former tunneller and one of the country’s prominent apostles of socialism, Semple helped to campaign for Hickey in Waihi.
Paddy Webb
Private collection
While Hickey ran for parliament in Waihi, Paddy Webb was the miners’ choice in Runanga on the west coast. Neither man won in 1911, but in 1913 Webb won a by-election to become the first coalminer to enter parliament.
Harry Holland

55 x 40
Harry was a silver-tongued Australian radical who was invited to New Zealand by the Waihi socialists to give a speaking tour. He stayed here for the rest of his life and became leader of the Labour Party.
Marjorie Noakes

55 x 40
A schoolgirl and miner’s daughter who, like Zena Norton, was passionate about the principles of her father’s union. “Why should men who work the hardest get the smallest pay, and those who do not work at all get millions of money?”
The mine manager’s dream
122 x 90
With the water level rising in the mineshafts and returns falling for the first time in a decade, industrial conflict threatens to overwhelm the diggings and the embattled mine manager sleeps uneasily.
Two on the beats and one in the watchhouse
Three panels, each panel
17 x 26
“Since the Strike commenced, there have been three Constables on night duty, two on the Beats and one in the Watchhouse.” 
The police inspector’s report

55 x 40
“I beg to report that ever since the Strike commenced… not one act of lawlessness of any kind has been committed”
The Cornish Pumphouse
120 x 90
This concrete castle housed the massive pumps that kept the mines free of water. During the strike they fell silent, and several strikers slipped underground to check how high the water levels had risen.” 
Rev. Robert Cleary
55 x 40
The local Anglican minister was one of several Waihi notables who signed a letter calling for the government to intervene in the strike. He was later made an honorary member of the scab union.
Commissioner Cullen
90 x 90
An iron-willed Irishman who rose from constable to Commissioner of Police, Cullen was prepared to break his own laws to defeat Waihi strikers and other ‘enemies of society’.
Bully boys and ex-cons
55 x 40
“the peace of Cullen the Police Commissioner and Herdman the voice of Justice, who sent in extra cops, scabs, bully boys and ex-cons”
The Snakecharmer
55 x 40
If there was trouble in Seddon Street, Waihi’s main thoroughfare, the sinister bowler-hatted strikebreaker known as the Snakecharmer was always there.
Harvey the Pug

55 x 40
The vicious ex-criminal recruited to help break the strike, he rode into town firing a pistol in each hand.
Hatpin Delaney
55 x 40
The blustering strikebreaker who gained his nickname after he was chased by 18-year-old Jessie Beames, armed only with the nine-inch hatpin she pulled from her cascade of chestnut hair.
The brakes

120  x 90
Strikebreakers were transported to and from the mine in open horse-drawn carriages, known as brakes. Sometimes a uniformed policeman held the reins. On every shift they faced a barrage of abuse from strikers and their families.
The Death of Fred Evans
32 x 23
Evans then fled in terror through a back door and into a vacant property behind the hall. “My father always said that he survived,” says Don Boswell, “because he could run faster than Fred Evans.”
Michael Rudd

55 x 40
The turncoat from the strikers’ ranks who compiled a list of his former colleagues. The strikebreakers worked through the list, giving each man and his family a day’s notice to be on the train out of town.
Georgina Parry
13 x 15
Georgina Parry, wife of the imprisoned union president, was threatened by a mob. “I said if they were men enough to attack me, I was woman enough to fight them.” 
Peter Fraser
55 x 40
The earnest Scot from the Federation of Labour who got Bill Parry released from Mt. Eden gaol. Like others prominent in the strike, Fraser entered parliament 20 years later.

The Scarlet Runners
120 x 40
Private Collection

The strikers’ sweethearts, wives and sisters who ran messages through police lines and later slipped into the besieged town to distribute relief supplies. 
The Taniwha
112 x 20
The river steamer that sailed between Paeroa and Auckland, carrying strikers, strikebreakers and gold. In November 1912 it transported the terrorised strikers’ families to safety.

The quotations with each painting are from “Waiheathens – Voices from a mining town,” by Mark Derby and Bob Kerr. A book that accompanies this exhibition. This book can be bought from the Waihi Gallery or from the publisher, Atuanui Press. atuanuipress.co.nz

The paintings are all oil on board. Their dimensions are in cm, width before height. If you are interested in purchasing any of these paintings please contact:
54 Kenny St Waihi 
Box 149 Waihi 3641
Phone 07 863 8386
Email: wacma@waihimuseum.co.nz

When they are showing in Rotorua and Auckland please contact:
12 Crummer Rd. Ponsonby
Auckland, New Zealand
Phone : +64 9 361 6331
Mobile: +64 21 639 789.
The show will travel in its complete state and works purchased from Waihi or Rotorua will be delivered at the conclusion of the showing at Whitespace in July.

Sunday, April 22, 2012

Hell Here Now - The Gallipoli diary of Alfred Cameron at Whitespace Contemporary Art




Whitespace is at 12 Crummer Road, Ponsonby, Auckland. The weekly opening hours: Tues to Fri 11-6pm | Sat 11-4pm. These new paintings about Alfred Cameron show his journey from his uncle’s farm at Culverden to Gallipoli. They will be on display at the Gallery until the 5th of May.

1  Leaving Culverden. 78 x 9 cms.
Alfred Cameron was working on his uncle’s farm at Culverden in North Canterbury when war was declared. He began his daily diary on the 13th August 1914 with the words, ‘Enlisted for first New Zealand Expeditionary Force to European War.’
Left Wellington at 6.30 a.m.  Eleven panels. Each panel 38 x 100.
On the 16th of October ten troop transports and their naval escorts steamed out of Wellington Harbour past a landscape that looked strangely like Gallipoli. Alfred Cameron was on board the Tahiti.
Saw camels for the first time. 180 x 40.
On the first of December Cameron sailed through the Suez Canal. He wrote in his diary about seeing camels for the first time.
There was scenery and doings en-route of much interest and novelty. Three panels, each panel 16.5 x 26.
The New Zealand troops disembarked at Alexandria and moved to a camp in the desert near Cairo.
A strange Christmas in the east.  24 x 34.
On Christmas day 1914 Cameron described a trip to the Pyramids.
The sea is very smooth and also very blueFour panels, each panel 40 x 38.
In early May Cameron writes, ‘Great news, off to the Dardanelles on Sunday.’ This was a four-day journey on the steam ship Grantully Castle.
Hell Here Now.  Ten panels. Each panel 60 x 120.
Cameron kept his diary for three weeks on Gallipoli. The last words he wrote at the end of May were, ‘Dam the place no good writing any more.’
Return to Cricklewood. 68 x 20.
In July Alfred Cameron was wounded and evacuated to a hospital in Cairo. He returned to New Zealand and became a farmer near Cricklewood in South Canterbury.

The paintings are all oil on board. You can contact White space here or by ringing 09 361 6331


Saturday, October 22, 2011

"The Rocky Barron Hills," opens at Suite Gallery, Oriental Bay, on Thursday 24th of November

In May 1826, Thomas Shepard, a young draftsman stood on the deck of  Captain James Herd's barque Rosana and drew a quick sketch of the South Coast and the entrance to Wellington Harbour. He described it like this. 
"Half the width is full of rocks so the entrance is rather dangerous, left side of the entrance are low rocky barron hills and on the right side are high rocky barron hills." 
These new paintings look again at those hills. They will be exhibited at Suite Gallery, 108 Oriental Parade from Thursday November the 24th. Come along to the opening at 5.30 on the 24th. The Gallery is open Thursday and Friday from 11 am to 5 pm and on Saturday from 11am. to 4 pm. and by appointment. To contact Suite Gallery click here;  http://www2.suite.co.nz/home 

Turakirae Head. Oil on board 120 x 120


Towards Tory Channel. Oil on Board, 20 x 180


Cape Terawhiti. Oil on board, 20 x 180 


The Brothers. Oil on board, 25 x 63 cms


Makaro/Ward Island, Oil on board, 25 x 63 cms


Red Rocks. Oil on board, 25 x 63 cms


Half the width is full of rocks. Oil on board, 25 x 63 cms


 Pencarrow and lake Kohangapiripiri. Oil on board, 25 x 63 cms